LE ROSSIGNOL SAUVAGE 
Saturday, August 7 2021 at 2:00PM - Abkhazi Gardens

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PERFORMERS

Jonathon Adams, baritone, traditional drum
Susie Napper, bass viol

Mélisande Corriveau, treble, bass viols, & recorder 

The nightingale, at liberty to sing of love and longing, is the star of this program devoted to songs of nature and nurture. These multicultural songs and gigues encompass many aspects of Canadian history with French, Scottish, Irish, and English colours woven into a complex and beautiful tapestry. The Métis songs, which survived in the memories of travelers from Quebec to the Prairies, are in Michif, French, and English. The earliest songs can be traced back to their European origins, with melodies that are remarkably similar to airs de cour, a form popular in 17th century France, that were often accompanied by viols. We hope you’ll enjoy hearing these beautiful songs, often plaintive, of the Rossignol Sauvage, a voice of the Métis people.

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PROGRAMME

Traditional Cree
Cree Song 

Sieur de Ste-Colombe (1640-1700)
Les Roulades

Traditional Métis
J’ai fait une maitresse*
Les petits oiseaux*

François Couperin (1668-1738)
Musètes de Choisi et Taverni

Jean Boyer (v. 1600-1648)
Que feray-je ? Que diray-je ?*

Louis Couperin (1626-1661)
Fantaisie pour les violes

Traditional Métis
La montagne sauvage*

Traditional Métis
En montant la rivière*

Sébastien Le Camus (ca. 1610-1677)
Amour Cruel*

Marin Marais (1656-1728)
Fantasie en écho

Andre Campra (16160-1774)
Doux échos

Traditional Métis
Le petit Rossignol Sauvage*

Michel Lambert (1619-1696)
Vos Mèpris

Traditional Cree
Cree Song

* Arrangement by Susie Napper

PROGRAMME NOTES

The nightingale, at liberty to sing of love and longing, is the star of this programme devoted to songs of nature and nurture! Multicultural, the songs, and gigues encompass many aspects of Canadian history with French, Scottish, Irish, and British colours are woven into a complex and beautiful tapestry.

Of their ambiguous status, little is known about the artistic life of the Métis and their unique contribution to Canadian culture during the 17th and 18th centuries.

***

The Métis songs, which thrived in the memories of travelers from Quebec to the Prairies, are in Michif, French, and English. The earliest songs can be traced back to their European origins. With a purely aural legacy and still sung by elderly Métis, the songs are being collected by Lynn Whidden at the University of Manitoba, Brandon. As with most traditional songs, the melody remains fairly constant but the improvised accompaniment changes as styles evolve. The earliest melodies are remarkably similar to airs de cour, a form popular in 17th century France, that were often accompanied by viols.

Music by composers of airs de cour can be found in the private collections of music found in Quebec’s family libraries. Henry Du Mont, Jean-Baptiste Morin, André Campra, Jean-Batiste Lully, and Marc-Antoine Charpentier also composed wonderful viol music some of which are featured in this concert.

***

Viols in Quebec? The French nuns in the Quebec convents were dedicated to the education of both European and indigenous children. In 1640, Mother Marie de l’Incarnation wrote that one of their indigenous wards, Agnés Chablikuchich had made great progress….in playing the viol. We know that instruments were abundant in Quebec.  A cache of twelve viols was found in the vaults of the Hôpital générale in Quebec City during the 19th century. Historically, however, as fashion dictated, most viols were cut down or built up to be transformed into violins, violas, and cellos by the end of the 18th century.

Imagination and creative thinking are intrinsic to a programme dependant on joining the dots! We hope you’ll enjoy hearing these beautiful songs, often plaintive, of the Rossignol Sauvage, a voice of the Métis people!

TICKETING

 

This concert is free of charge. No tickets or reservations required.

GETTING TO ABKHAZI GARDENS

Parking Information

The Gardens are located at 1964 Fairfield Rd. in Victoria.

Parking on the street is available, preferably on the north side of Fairfield Road, adjacent to the garden. Please do not park in the spaces marked ‘Residential Parking Only’.